Healing Word 5e (5th Edition) Spell for DND Spells

A creature of your choice that you simply can see within range regains hit points adequate to 1d4 + your spellcasting ability modifier. This spell has no effect on undead or constructs.

At Higher Levels: once you cast this spell using a spell slot of 2nd level or higher, the healing increases by 1d4 for every slot level above 1st.

Well, we’ve strapped into our heaviest boots and we’re ready now to require on a replacement lie that has been circulating within the D&D community these past few weeks. No, the healing word isn’t overpowered.

Table of Contents

Healing Word 5e

Healing Word 5e

  • LEVEL: 1st
  • School: Evocation
  • Casting Time: 1 bonus action
  • Range: 60 feet
  • Components: V
  • Duration: Instantaneous
  • Classes: Bard, Cleric, Druid
  • Attack/Save: None
  • Damage/Effect: Healing

Given that Cody came to Fifth Edition from Third Edition, we’re quite disappointed in him for holding his opinions about this healing spell. The genius of this spell should be evident to anyone who played a healer in previous editions, where you were essentially an ambulatory hit point dispenser. A typical turn for a Third-Edition healer consisted of running to their various fallen party members and casting cure wounds. This was a part of the sport design; it had been expected. Clerics even had a feature called spontaneous casting that allowed them to drop a spell that they had prepared to cast cure wounds (this was back once you prepared spells to spell slots, so if you wanted to cast cure wounds quite once you needed to possess it prepared multiple times).

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What Fifth Edition has through with the healing word is liberate those characters who would otherwise are relegated to full-time healers. With a healing word, you’ll heal an ally and also attack an enemy, making you’re feeling as if you are quite just your spell slots. Everyone gets to possess fun in combat, not just the non-healers. This is often keeping with the planning strategy of Fifth Edition placing fun overbalance.

Instead, the character can cast a healing word using a bonus action then use their action to cast a cantrip or make an attack, all without “adding actions to the economy” (that is: triggering opportunity attacks from enemies). Cody calls this casting it “for free”.

Ultimately, Cody is ignoring an overriding drawback to casting a bonus action spell. That is: that it limits your options for what spells you’ll cast using your action thereon address cantrips. If you’ve lost concentration on your key spells, like a buff spell that basically helps your party’s effectiveness (like bless or shield of faith), or a spell which debuffs your enemies (like bestow curse), you can’t cast them again if you use healing word. If you would like to get down some hurt with a flame strike or cleanse a harmful status with a remove curse, you can’t do this if you use a healing word.

Therefore, while casting this spell might not take your action, it certainly affects what you’ll do thereupon action. That’s a serious part of the value of using a healing word.

We don’t want to pass judgment on how Cody plays D&D, but it must be said that a spellcaster who never casts a spell aside from the healing word isn’t leveraging their class’ abilities alright. If there are issues with combat, it’s more likely because the caster is saving all their spell slots for healing words than because that spell possesses the barbarian back on his feet.

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